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was elected governor of california. four years later, richard nixon was president. they have something the democrats did not have. they have a great post-boomer generation and trade when you think of them, -- a generation. when you think of them, that is a pretty good bench of energetic, slick, youngish politicians. when you are talking about the democratic party you are talking about joe biden and hillary clinton. we might prefer them to the republican contenders but that is a different generation. there is not this deep democratic bench. >> mr. obama has won a second term. what is your sense of the kind of legacy that he wants to leave in the second term. is he going to be more progressive. toss me about obama's future right quick. >> -- tell me about obama's feature right quick. >> he wants to have a very free pass toward enactment. he would like to fix the fiscal stuff that is on the table even as we speak. i want to believe but i do not have any reason to believe that he would want part of his legacy to deal with the inequality in this country, the short sick that the middle-class
california is not what used to be. >> i grew up in los angeles at a time and was a very beautiful city. it was just at the end of the second world war and there was spaces in between the communities. there was spaces and the spaces or green. the air was fresh and clean. all of which we took for granted. pavement and concrete and skyscrapers were being developed and the space in between began to get closed off by concrete and pavement and what came with it, bad air, more cars. >> you did not see that as progress? >> i did not. i saw it as loss. >> what impact do you think that sandy has had on the climate change conversation? >> in some cases, it started the conversation. in other cases, increased the conversation. it has put the deniers on the offensive. you see it bloomberg, gov. christie coming together. something changed. it was provoked by this horrible of the end. maybe it is a sign that something is about to happen that is more positive. >> do you have confidence in obama's second term that climate change will be more of an issue? >> it was not. sadly, it was not an election issu
jersey as cokie pointed out but also places like california which are states that he would have won anyway but there was so much organic enthusiasm for barack obama in 2008 that he won -- that a lot of people turned out even in deep blue states where their votes, of course, didn't count, they turned out in mass numbers. the president's people knee this year that's not going to happen. so in terms of the overall national popular vote, if you think about red states and blue states where neither campaign is trying to turn out the vote, the blue states like california and new york for various reasons the president's numbers won't be anywhere near as strong as they were in 2008 whereas in the deep red state there is's so much antipathy towards the president that people will turn out in those states even though they are deep red states. they'll turn out the cast a symbolic vote against barack obama. so that's one thing that skews the popular vote by conceivably on election day towards romney more than people are necessarily expecting >> i think that's absolutely right. the red states are
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)

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